Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges


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However, we can only book up to 9 passengers online. So that we may help you further, please fill out a quote request form.

We just need a few details. One of our travel experts will be in touch within 48 hours to help with your enquiry. Please try again later or call our booking team on Please read our privacy policy. Please note: Drivers must be over the age of 21 to hire a car unless otherwise specified. Drivers between 21 and 24 years of age may be subject to additional costs. No one should miss out on the adventure of a lifetime, regardless of ability. Across the world, the laws determining how accessible hotels and accommodation are will vary.

So rather than baffling you with local by-laws and exclusions, we keep it simple with three generalised categories for our accessible holidays listings:. Properties that offer good general access for those guests who are able to walk short distances and can manage up to six steps. Wheelchair accessible properties that offer wheelchair adapted rooms with either roll-in shower or bath tub with grab rails.

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Please request this at the time of booking. There should be nothing holding you back from the perfect holiday. Whether you need an adapted transfer vehicle or wish to take to the wheel yourself and hire a car, we've got it covered.

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If you rely on a carer to help you with everyday activities, let us know. We can make sure all the details are taken care of, such as suggesting resorts that are suitable for both of you, that you travel together, and that accommodation is available for both travelling companions. Travelling with conditions like autism or ADHD can be hard for famillies.

That's where our special assistance team come in handy. They know it's the little details that make time away enjoyable for everyone. Flying with Virgin Atlantic? Suzie goes on an aeroplane. The sensory room is a calming and relaxing environment, designed for passengers with disabilities like autism, dementia or cognitive impairment, who will benefit from a safe and distracting place when in unfamiliar surroundings. Having concluded her shopping, Jane has finally started to memorise the series of steps required to adjust her sound system to play CDs, and to turn on her set top box to get TV channels.

All is fine, until she pushes the wrong button and everything goes silent. If only she could read the displays, or if she could read the manuals which are only available in print, and are full of icons and pictures she might get some clues as to trouble-shooting. Now Jane will have to ask her brother to visit again , to help her get things running. Appendix B contains email to the author that further expands on access challenges with Hi-Fi equipment. Just as Jane starts to feel on top of some of her access challenges with the appliances in her apartment, she is asked to work interstate, and is being put up in a company-owned apartment in Melbourne.

The problem is that the dishwasher, microwave, cooktop and washing machine are all unusable by a person without sight. Solution - Home deliveries and laundry services. Chris has recently retired from work because of health issues - increasing arthritis and a tremor in his hands.

Commonplace tasks like replacing the bag from his vacuum cleaner are getting difficult and painful, requiring twisting and pulling, which further inflames his arthritis. Below are some examples of things considered in scope, and therefore the focus of this document:. This report makes occasional reference to other classes of devices mobile phones or non-electronic items kitchen utensils , because research in such areas shed some light on the forces at play in manufacture, design and marketing of consumer electronics, or positive success stories which may be transferable to this area.

These figures are largely based on self-reporting. Interestingly, estimates of people with some kind of hearing impairment are nearly one in five, and the same again for Australians with some level of arthritis. This suggests that the official figure could well be understating the size of the population with some kind of disability.

But, in fact, the situation is worse than that. For all of us, whether we consider ourselves disabled or not, we will, at some time in our life — whether through age, illness or accidents, have a short or longer-term disability. It is well documented that designers are prone to design environments and devices best suited to their own capabilities, architecturally and technologically.

Accessibility

Even in , manufacturers, marketers and designers still create devices which are suited to their own cerebral capabilities; full vision, hearing and dexterity. More progressive design approaches, such as User Centred Design, which are described later in this paper, are a path towards the design of more inclusive products. For example, even with modern market research, the people who are selected usually represent people who have no disabilities.

Market Research participants firstly need to get to an external location, then they need to be able to read information, complete survey forms, respond to visual mock-ups of products and services etc. At times, some organizations have been in contact with manufacturers to explain the needs, eg. The author was told about such contact with Electrolux by the Royal Society for the Blind in Adelaide.

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Although both interest and understanding were initially shown, eventually off-shore manufacture and changes in the manufacturing organization meant that results never came to fruition. As discussed below, some change in corporate culture appears to be underway in the US with WhirlPool, although to date this is only reflected in a few products. Research at WhirlPool found that adding tone feedback to the controls on washers and dryers was also helpful to, and appreciated by customers with full vision, as it gave extra confirmation of their instruction.

LG is also known for its use of audible tones, to provide information about washing machine settings and modes. This discussion paper gives particular attention to dexterity and vision issues, however the problem is even more widespread and impacts on a huge number of potential customers and consumers of products. Some of the reasons for inaccessible design include:. In the following paragraphs we briefly explore different faculties and impairments and how design decisions in products will affect each of these groups.

Braille Innovation Across the World Could Change How Blind Users Access Information

These abilities can be affected by the demands of everyday tasks such as inserting a key into a door lock in the dark, reading a book under the glare of bright sun, or driving in heavy rain. Additionally some people have difficulty seeing due to disabilities like colour blindness, glaucoma and cataracts, through to total blindness. In modern products, the use of touch screens and menus in place of mechanical interfaces can make them completely unusable by people without sufficient vision, whereas in the past, whilst it was helpful to have vision to use the product, the process could be learned or memorised.

This is described in detail in a conference Article from the National Federation of the Blind. Modern designs frequently minimise colour contrast with silver buttons on silver backgrounds, etc. Everyone is unique in their abilities to carry on a conversation, detect the direction a sound is coming from, and hear high- or low-pitched sounds.

These abilities can be affected by the demands of everyday tasks like hearing normal sounds with a head cold, using a mobile phone on a noisy street corner, or operating noisy machinery. In addition, some people have difficulty hearing due to disabilities like tinnitus. So smoke alarms, door bells, intercoms, which only produce audio, can be ineffective.

Everyone is unique in their abilities to reach, lift, carry, and manipulate objects. These abilities can be affected by the demands of twisting a door knob with wet or oily hands, writing with your non-dominant hand or unlocking a door while carrying groceries.

In addition, some people have difficulty using their arms and hands due to disabilities like arthritis, bursitis and tendonitis, or loss of one arm. The trend towards miniaturisation for electronic products maybe cool, but can obviously make them very difficult to use for people with fine motor control problems, tremors, etc. With the remote control lying on a flat surface, with the underside curved at the edges, pressing one of the buttons located on the left or right edges of the remote control makes the remote control tip.

Also, like with mobile phones, the buttons are becoming smaller and placed close to each other. Everyone is unique in their abilities to receive, understand, remember and act on information. These abilities can be affected by everyday tasks like driving safely while having a conversation, concentrating while under the influence of medication and trying to follow confusing road signs.

The trend towards ever-increasing lists of features, complex menu structures, buttons and settings on devices has challenged everyone, but particularly for people who have more difficulty comprehending, remembering or making decisions. For people with significant cognitive disabilities, adding one extra step in a process can be the difference between whether the device can be used by them or not. For example, when a television set only had a volume control, a channel selector nob and a control for vertical hold, almost anyone could work it.

But with multi-media home entertainment systems, it is often the eight-year old who has the best understanding of the complex interactions between different components of the system. One of the strategies that people who are blind adopt in order to use consumer electronics is to memorise the complex set of steps needed to perform a task. This is challenging because they are unable to see the feedback of their actions. This makes it particularly challenging for a person, who in addition to being vision impaired, has a memory or cognitive impairment.

Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges
Special Needs Weddings: A Guide for Persons with Visual, Hearing, or Mobility Challenges

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